Parsha Miketz Rabbi Fishel Todd

Rabbi Fishel Todd discusses Parshas Mikeitz(76)

Rabbi Fishel Todd

 

Rashi teaches us the meaning of a familiar word

Genesis 42:34

“And bring your younger brother to me and I will know that you are not spies but that you are honest; your brother, (Simon) I will give back to you and you can travel the land.”

RASHI

And you can travel the land. Rashi: [It means literally] you can travel around the land. All such words [ in Hebrew] as ‘socharim’ (merchants) and ‘sechora’ (merchandise) are derived from the fact that they travel around ( in Hebrew ‘sechor’ = around) after business.

WHAT IS RASHI SAYING ?

Rashi tells us the meaning of the word ’tischoru’. The root is ‘s’chor’ which literally means ‘around’, but frequently it has the derived meaning of doing business, because businessmen travel around a lot.

RASHI’S STYLE IN TEACHING WORD MEANINGS

Rashi often tells us the meaning of words in the Torah. When he teaches us the meaning of a strange or rare word there is no problem. His comment is necessary because we need his help. But when he teaches us the meaning of a familiar word, which he does occasionally, we have two questions. 1) Why the need to teach us the meaning of a familiar word? & 2) If the word has already appeared in the Torah why didn’t Rashi tell us its meaning the first time it appeared?

Which question would you ask of Rashi?

Hint: See verses above 23: 16; 34:10; and 37:28.

Your Question:

QUESTIONING RASHI

A Question: We see from that this word has already appeared in the Torah several times. Why did Rashi wait until now to teach us its meaning?

Can you see a reason for this?

Hint: Note that this verse is spoken by the brothers to Jacob; they are quoting what Joseph had said to them. You can see the exact quote of Joseph in verse 42:20. Is there a difference between what Joseph actually said and what they quoted him as saying?

EXAMINING THE VERSE CLOSELY

Rabbi Fishel Todd Answer: Of course there is a difference. All that Joseph said was that if they bring their younger brother then they will be believed that they are not spies. He said nothing about “sechora”.

So why did the brothers add this gratuitous phrase?

Can you think of an answer?

Your Answer:

A CLOSER LOOK

An Answer: The brothers were on the defensive, since they returned without Simon. They didn’t tell their father Jacob everything. They did not tell him that Simon was being held in prison. They wanted to convince Jacob to release Benjamin in their custody so they could get the needed food in Egypt. Perhaps they figured that if they reported the man was very cold and distant Jacob would remain hesitant and fearful. So they improved on what he had actually said a bit; they said he would then consider them as foreigners in good standing and they could even tour the country freely.

HOW HAS RASHI TAUGHT US THIS?

Rashi too was bothered by the way the brothers misquoted Joseph’s words. He understood that this was done intentionally. Their use of the word “tischoru’ must mean “travel around” freely and not have its usual meaning of doing business. If the word meant to do business this would mean that Joseph jumped from suspecting them as spies and restricting their movement to allowing them become equal to all citizens, permitted to do business in his country! No. That would sound too strange to Jacob. So their meaning must that the man considered them to be in good standing and permitted to travel freely through the country. That sounded reasonable. It is for this reason that Rashi says the word does not mean business here, which usually does; it means just to travel around.

And it is for this reason that Rashi did not have to tell us the meaning of the word ‘sechoruha’ above (Genesis 34:10) because in that verse it had its usually meaning of doing business and Rashi assumed we knew its meaning. Only here where it does not mean to do business does Rashi need to enlighten us.

AN INTERESTING NOTE Rabbi Fishel Todd

It is interesting and enlightening to note that even these reasonable words still did not convince Jacob to let them take Benjamin. It was only Judah later (42:3- 10) who put everything on the table in a straightforward, unadorned manner that Jacob finally conceded to let Benjamin go with them.

Rabbi Fishel Todd

Genesis 42:2″And he said ‘Behold, I have heard that there are provisions in Egypt. Go down there and purchase for us there, that we may live and not die.’ “RASHIGo down there: RASHI: He did not say ‘go’ (but rather ‘Go down’) This is a hint to the two hundred and ten years that they (the Nation Israel) were to be enslaved in Egypt. For the Hebrew word “R’du” (Go down) is numerically 210.”Look at Rashi on verse Genesis 45:9.Do you have a question on our Rashi-comment?Your Question:QUESTIONING RASHIA Question: This Rashi comment assumes that the word “go” (“l’chu” in Hebrew) is more appropriate than “r’du’. But this is not so. Rashi himself has tells us further on (Genesis 45:9) that EretzYisrael is higher than all other lands, thus when speaking of going to Eretz Yisrael the Torah uses the word “alu” (“go up”) and conversely when one leaves Eretz Yisrael the Torah uses the word “to go down.” So Jacob’s word here – “go down there (to Egypt)” is appropriate. How can Rashi imply that he should have said “go” and not “go down”?A difficult question.Can you think of an answer?Hint: Look carefully at verse 45:9. That verse speaks of “going up” and our verse speaks of “going down”. But can you see another difference between our verse and that one?Your Answer:UNDERSTANDING RASHIAn Answer: Rashi’s point is well taken. Because while the Torah uses the words “going up” and “going down” when coming to and leaving Eretz Yisrael, Jacob does not. See verse Genesis 45:28 where it says: “And Israel (Jacob) said: It is great that my son Joseph is still alive. I will go (Hebrew “ailcha”) and see him before I die.” So we see that when Jacob speaks of going to Egypt he himself uses the word “to go.” And not “go down.” Thus Rashi’s focusing on Jacob’s use of the word “go down” in our verse is correct. So Jacob himself should not have used the word “r’du”, though the Torah itself does. He must have used this word because it had other connotations in this context. His word “going down” has a negative connotation and implied going down into slavery – for 210 years.A LESSONThe Torah’s words as a narrative may be quite different from an individual’s quote in the Torah. There are other instances in the Torah where this is the case. The lesson is to closely examine Rashi’s comments, especially when it seems that he contradicts himself. He was quite careful in his choice of words and in his comments.Shabbat ShalomV’Chanuka SomayachAvigdor Bonchek “What’s Bothering Rashi?” is a product of the Institute for the Study of Rashi and Early Commentaries Rabbi Fishel Todd.

Parashas Miketz (5762)

Rashi makes us aware that we hadn’t fully understood the Torah verse. But first we must understand Rashi!

Genesis 42:23

RASHI

For the interpreter was between them: RASHI: For when they had spoken to him there was an interpreter between them who knew both the Hebrew and the Egyptian languages. He interpreted their words to Joseph and Joseph’s words to them. Consequently they were under the impression that Joseph did not understand the Hebrew language.

What is your question on Rashi?

QUESTIONING RASHI

A Question:

Rashi seems to be telling us what the Hebrew word “ mailitz” (interpreter) means. He certainly could have told us that in much less words. Why is he belaboring the point? What is bothering him?

Hint:

Read the Torah sentence again and ask yourself what it says.

“And they did not know that Joseph understood, because the interpreter was between them.”

What question would you ask on this verse? Does that make sense to you?

WHAT IS BOTHERING RASHI?

Your Answer:

An Answer:

Of course it doesn’t make sense! Because the interpreter was between them, they didn’t think that Joseph understood? Quite the contrary, only because the translator was between them, could Joseph understand what they were saying.

Now look at Rashi’s comment and see how he explains away this question. Do you understand?

Your Answer:

UNDERSTANDING RASHI

An Answer:

By the addition of a word or two, Rashi solves the problem. Rashi says; “When they had spoken to him there was a translator between them.” Rashi conveniently puts the verse in the past tense. Meaning that since in their previous conversations with Joseph, the translator had been present, they assumed that he didn’t understand Hebrew. But now the translator wasn’t present (for they weren’t speaking to Joseph) so they could freely speak among themselves.

In his effortless manner, Rashi points out the correct meaning of the verse.

Rabbi Fishel Todd

Parashas Miketz

Rashi makes us aware that we hadn’t fully understood the Torah verse.
But first we must understand Rashi!

Genesis 42:23

For the interpreter was between them: Rashi: For when they had spoken to him there was an interpreter between them who knew both the Hebrew and the Egyptian languages. He interpreted their words to Joseph and Joseph’s words to them. Consequently they were under the impression that Joseph did not understand the Hebrew language.

What is your question on Rashi?

 

 

Questioning Rashi

A Question:

Rashi seems to be telling us what the Hebrew word “ mailitz” (interpreter) means. He certainly could have told us that in much less words. Why is he belaboring the point? What is bothering him?

Hint:

Read the Torah sentence again and ask yourself what it says.

 

 

And they did not know that Joseph understood, because the interpreter was between them.

What question would you ask on this verse? Does that make sense to you?

 

 

What Is Bothering Rashi?

Your Answer:

An Answer:

Of course it doesn’t make sense! Because the interpreter was between them, they didn’t think that Joseph understood? Quite the contrary, only because the translator was between them, could Joseph understand what they were saying.

Now look at Rashi’s comment and see how he explains away this question. Do you understand?

 

 

Understanding Rashi

An Answer :

By the addition of a word or two, Rashi solves the problem. Rashi says; “When they had spoken to him there was a translator between them.” Rashi conveniently puts the verse in the past tense. Meaning that since in their previous conversations with Joseph, the translator had been present, they assumed that he didn’t understand Hebrew. But now the translator wasn’t present (for they weren’t speaking to Joseph) so they could freely speak among themselves.

Rabbi Fishel Todd

In his effortless manner, Rashi points out the correct meaning of the verse.

 

Parashas Miketz

 

 

The suspenseful story of Joseph and his brothers is reaching a fever pitch in this week’s sedra. On Verse 42:23 it says:

“And he (Joseph) turned away from them and wept and he returned to them again and spoke to them and then took Shimon from them and he bound him up in front of them.”

RASHI

“Shimon”: Rashi: He had thrown him into the pit etc. See the full comment there.

Of course the big question is & this is what Rashi is dealing with: Why suddenly did Joseph grab Shimon of all brothers to put in jail? Notice that the Torah mentions Shimon by name. It wouldn’t do that unless it had significance. In the whole story of Joseph and his brothers no brothers are mentioned by name except Joseph, Reuven and Yehudah. And now Shimon! Rashi’s answer as to why Shimon was singled out is that he was the one who threw Joseph into the pit.

But we can confirm this by seeing the verses immediately prior to this. It says that the brothers bemoaned their guilt for what they had done years ago to their brother, Joseph. Then Reuven says “Didn’t I tell you then ‘don’t sin with the boy’ but you didn’t listen!” All the years Joseph was in Egypt he had blamed Reuven for all that happened to him. Because Reuven was the first born, he was the leader and responsible for the brothers’ actions. Why hadn’t he stopped them? he wondered. Now that he overheard Reuven’s remark he realized that he had blamed Reuven unjustly. At that point Joseph looked to the next in line. Who was that? Shimon, the second oldest. why hadn’t he backed Reuven’s protest? So he chose him and threw him in jail. See how beautiful this logic is. See verse 27 where it says “one opened his saddle bag to feed his donkey” etc. Rashi says it was Levi. Why Levi?

Let’s begin with another question: Why only did only this brother find his money in his saddlebag? Didn’t the others also have donkeys to feed? They did eventually find their money at the bottom of their bags when the got home to Jacob. see that only “the one” (who Rashi says is Levi) found his at the opening of his bag and not down beneath as the others did. Why was his at the top of the bag and the others at the bottom?

Answer: Levi is brother number 3 !!! Joseph was going down the line of brothers. He made Levi worry longer than the others, because why hadn’t he who was the third oldest brother spoken up on his behalf years ago and stopped the sale into slavery? The story isn’t over. The next accusation about the stolen chalice seems to wake Yehuda up and he is number four!! Therefore “And Yehuda drew near” (next week’s sedra).

 

Rabbi Fishel Todd

 

15 Replies to “Parsha Miketz Rabbi Fishel Todd”

  1. I don’t know where this quote is from, but I like the topic of the post, I honestly don’t know how to comment on this and what I would ask him, what kind of question.
    CLOSER OBSERVATION
    Answer: The brothers were on the defensive because they returned without Simon. They didn’t tell Father Jacob everything. He was not told that Simon was being held in prison. They wanted to persuade Jacob to release Benjamin under their detention so that they could get the necessary food in Egypt. Maybe they realized that if they find out that the man is very cold, and the distant Jacob will remain indecisive and scared. They improved so little what he actually said; they said that they would then consider them foreigners with a good reputation, and they could even travel freely around the country. From which holy book is this quote? Greetings and I wish you a lot of success in your future work.

  2. The way things are worded in our bibles, it is sometimes difficult to understand the original meaning of the words and phraes.  We tend to want to assign meaning according to the meaning of those words in this day and age.  It’s fortunate that we have people like you to help us understand the nuanced meaning here.  I thank you for being here to do that, from the big stuff, such as Shimon throwing Joseph into the pit, to the little things, like the different meanings to “go up”, “go down” and to just “go’!

  3. Hello there, thank you so much for sharing this. this is a very awesome piece and a very detailed one. I’m really happy I came across this. Reading about Parsha Miketz Rabbi Fisher Todd sounds really amazing. Everything about this article really caught my attention. Those bible stories were indeed awesome

  4. Hello there, thank for sharing such wonderful information about this and I am sure there are so many people how haeb little knowledge of it just like myself and that is very important to see this. I have learned a lot here and so many people will be happy to see this article and that is why I am willing to share with other people that I know. 

  5. Howdy! Good day. Dropping by to tell you I loved your post. It always is a thing of joy coming across Jewish History. The story is always very interesting.  I appreciate how you took your time to state clearly, step by step the story on Parsha Miketz Rabbi Fishel Todd, those bible stories truly was lovely

  6. I was surprised to know that they would leave Simon in prison even when they’re brothers, I guess human nature including the flaws are a part of us that we can never get rid of but rather curb and Parsha Miketz reminded us of the importance of forgiveness. If I read it right, that is. Great share and very mind-opening 🙂

  7. It is nice to read through this and I really like the idea of using some certain known phenomenal instances as leading description for thai teaching. Thank for putting this out here, it is very delightful to read through and it is very pleasant for the kind, thanks for sharing it here, I look forward to seeing more.

  8. Hello there, Thank you for sharing this sermon this morning. I feel very blessed being part this morning. I really appreciate your great efforts in getting this together and getting it done in ways that are so great to understand. I have so many questions. I would prefer having to asked them in your social media accounts. I hope that is possible. Thanks once again for this.

  9. Another very interesting one to see here and I value it here. I like the way you have presented this here and di honestly value this. The way you have presented this here and the teaching you have given for us here is great. You can rest assured that I have gained a lot more information from what you have presented here. Thanks

  10. Rashi too was annoyed by the manner in which the siblings misquoted Joseph’s words. He comprehended that this was done deliberately. Their utilization of “tischoru’ should signify “travel around” unreservedly and not have its standard significance of working together. On the off chance that the word intended to work together this would imply that Joseph bounced from suspecting them as spies and limiting their development to permitting them become equivalent to all residents, allowed to work together in his nation!

  11. Wahoo, i never saw the phrase you can travel around in this light. I have read that portion of scripture severally and taught people from it. But now I see it in a different light, not just wandering on the land but stay on the land as long as you want and do business on the land. thank you for this insight 

  12. Thanks for the Parsha Miketz Rabbi Fishel Todd’s sermon! Glad I made it to reading this today!  From the story, it is obvious Rashi got angry at the way his brothers quoted Joseph wrongly. He saw conspiracy in what they did. Good to know Parsha Miketz showed us the significance of forgiveness!

    I think Simon’s brothers left and forgot him in prison due to human Adamic nature that’s difficult for anyone to get rid of except by outstanding, unique grace. Thanks for the thoughtful sermon!

    Joyce

  13. Learning about other cultures is why I come to websites like this one right here. I love learning about this stuff. It’s all so fascinating to me. You do such a good job a dumbing things down for those of us who cannot understand what this is like and who are unfamiliar with other cultures like this one Thank you so much for this and may God bless you

  14. Hello there! Thank you for writing this. Great post! Certainly opened my eyes regarding the bible! Really learnt a whole lot by reading this. The bible way written in such a way that it is quite difficult to understand by mere reading! Our English bible is practically a “Rephrase” of the original happenings

  15. Interesting article, thank you for sharing. I do enjoy taking stories out of the bible and dissecting them like this and figuring out all of the hidden meanings therein. It is such a shame that a lot of the original context has been lost to time and because of the many translations the original text has undergone. I would love to sit down with an original text and read it some day.

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